Francesco Simeti

Now What?

  • roll dimension: 45 x 1500 cm
  • pattern dimension: W540 x 360H cm

SUBSTRATES

Now What?

Now What?

You guys are running out of time - F. Simeti

Francesco Simeti's work plunges us into a fantastic landscape in which plants and flowers envelop the space in a riot of vegetation that looks inviting but when observed carefully hides anomalies.  

Extrapolated from old books on mountain flowers, the natural elements are re-purposed in oversized form, magnified to the point of transforming a possible garden into an unreal jungle.

Behind the apparent beauty appear worried eyes. These are the eyes of the animal world, which is afraid to look at what we are doing to nature, eyes that blend in with the vegetation, shadows in the darkness reminding us of our responsibilities and that we are not alone. 

In Francesco Simeti's work, a persuasive aesthetic sense conceals a deeper, more raw interpretation, a warning to our society about the environmental and social devastation we are causing and which we mask behind false appearances. It is a hidden message that we need to search out with care and that invites us not to stop at the surface. 

The work Now What? is a repeating module creating a floral pattern of warm colours, a refined aesthetic sense and a precise formal construction.

Simeti was one of the first artists in Italy to use wallpaper as a stylistic device and to translate it into a work of art.

Francesco Simeti

Francesco Simeti (Palermo, 1968) lives and works in Brooklyn (New York). He is known for his site-specific installations that present aesthetically appealing scenes which on closer inspection reveal more complex contexts. Simeti appropriates images from newspapers and magazines, raising questions about the nature and role of this imagery in society.

Public art plays a fundamental role in his artistic practice. In the United States he has worked on projects commissioned by Percent for Art in New York, Multnomah County in Oregon and has created permanent installations for underground stations in Brooklyn, Chicago and Los Angeles.

Francesco Simeti